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Trump Wants You to Think All the Immigrants He’ll Deport Are Criminals. They’re Not.

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President Trump on Tuesday night blamed undocumented immigrants for violent, criminal behavior — also accusing them of hurting the economy, stealing jobs from struggling families, costing the government billions of dollars, and generally creating “an environment of lawless chaos.”

The man who began his presidential campaign talking about “rapists” coming over the border cast his crusade to deport and block undocumented immigrants as a moral choice between protecting Americans or leaving them vulnerable to exploitation and death. “What would you say to the American family that loses their jobs, their income, or a loved one, because America refused to uphold its laws and defend its borders?” he asked.

Trump’s special guests at his joint address to Congress included relatives of Americans who had been killed by undocumented immigrants. “We will never stop fighting for justice. Your loved ones will never be forgotten, we will always honor their memory,” Trump promised them.

He also touted the creation several weeks ago of a special office in the Department of Homeland Security called Victims of Immigration Crime Engagement, or VOICE. This office will be tasked with recording crimes committed by undocumented immigrants and supporting those victimized by them. Its funding will come in part from canceling all DHS “outreach or advocacy services” for undocumented immigrants.

Trump claims his immigration crackdown is a way to keep Americans safe — that he isn’t interested in tearing apart families, just in stopping violent criminals. VOICE will give the Trump administration a stream of propaganda intended to reshape the image of undocumented immigrants in the minds of the American public, from one where these migrants are simply seeking a better future for their families to one where they are hardened criminals, ready to prey on innocent Americans.

That’s a big lie. The reality is that undocumented immigrants are no more likely to commit crimes in America than anyone else. And there are plenty of migrants who are not violent criminals who are being targeted by immigration enforcement. As a result, innocent people are fearful.

“There’s so much fear in immigrant communities across the country right now,” said Joanne Lin, who works on immigration issues at the American Civil Liberties Union. “I’m getting calls from teachers, principals, educators, clergy, and these fears are not exaggerated. They’re very real fears. And people have heard about the stories of homeless men emerging from a shelter and being arrested. About a domestic violence survivor going to court for her own protection and being nabbed by immigration agents. These are the worst kinds of cases and they have ripple effects across the country.”

And even if Trump meant what he was saying about only deporting criminals — Tuesday night, for instance, he said that “As we speak, we are removing gang members, drug dealers, and criminals that threaten our communities and prey on our citizens. Bad ones are going out as I speak tonight and as I have promised” — that’s simply not a credible plan.

Most recently, President Obama made a real effort to focus immigration enforcement on criminals — and yet even then, many of the people deported did not have criminal backgrounds at all.

ICE itself keeps public data on who it removed from the country during the Obama years. Even as it got better at focusing on convicted criminals, a very substantial number were noncriminals. In Fiscal Year 2015, 139,368 convicted criminals were removed by ICE; the same year, 96,045 noncriminals were removed:

That’s just the ICE deportations, which are focused on the interior of the country. Elliot Young, a history professor at Lewis & Clark College who studies immigration, tallied the numbers using government data that includes deportations by the Border Patrol and other agencies that do removals closer to the border. He concluded that 56 percent of immigrants who were removed from the country between 2009 and 2015 were noncriminals. He made the following chart to illustrate this:

Screen-Shot-2017-03-01-at-12.09.29-PM-1488400165

Dr. Elliot Young "The Hard Truths About Obama’s Deportation Priorities" access here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/hard-truths-about-obamas-deportation-priorities_us_58b3c9e7e4b0658fc20f979e

“Obama was more believable than Trump and it wasn’t true when he said it,” Young said of both presidents’ supposed focus on criminals. Even if the government is truly trying to target criminals, “the reality on the ground is that they are picking up lots of people who either don’t have any criminal convictions or they have low level misdemeanors or have crossed the border more than once and have been deported which then becomes a criminal offense.”

And the Trump administration has already expanded its focus beyond criminals. In the executive order he signed on January 25, Trump laid out “enforcement priorities” for removals by the Department of Homeland Security that include immigrants who have “committed acts that constitute a chargeable criminal offense” or who have “abused any program related to receipt of public benefits.” These immigrants have the exact same priority as those who have been charged for criminal offenses.

The ACLU’s Joanne Lin explained that the executive order basically makes all undocumented immigrants a “priority” for removal. “So, like, jaywalking, have you ever driven without your wallet because you left your wallet at home? That begs the question whether any of us could actually meet that standard, in all candor,” she said.

“Because it doesn’t say that you’ve been arrested, you’ve been charged, you’ve been booked, it just says you ‘committed,'” she said. “It’s very wide berth. It’s written that way because under this administration they want every undocumented immigrant to be a potential priority.”

Top photo: Guatemalan deportee Eric Perez kisses his daughter Kimberly after he arrived on an ICE deportation flight on Feb. 9, 2017, to Guatemala City, Guatemala. The charter jet, carrying 135 deportees, arrived from Texas.

The post Trump Wants You to Think All the Immigrants He’ll Deport Are Criminals. They’re Not. appeared first on The Intercept.

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gradualepiphany
115 days ago
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"The reality is that undocumented immigrants are no more likely to commit crimes in America than anyone else."

The Intercept IS aware that it is a crime to enter the country without permission, right?
Los Angeles, California, USA
dori
115 days ago
A large percentage are people who entered perfectly legally, who then outstayed their visas. Being undocumented does not automatically imply that someone entered the country illegally.
superiphi
114 days ago
it is not a crime to be in the country on an expired visa, or working when one has a student visa etc. Just an administrative offense like being late filing taxes etc.
sfrazer
114 days ago
There's an argument that says, thanks to overly broad laws, we are all committing crimes every day. Given that, the statement you quoted is correct. The book "Three Felonies a Day" goes into detail on that theory if you're interested. http://www.harveysilverglate.com/books/
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superiphi
114 days ago
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he wants people to think that being here without the proper paperwork and permits is in itself a crime, rather than an administrative offense
Idle, Bradford, United Kingdom

Porsche Debuts Panamera Sport Turismo

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For far too long, the Porsche Panamera was a phenomenal performance machine with a face only a mother could love. With the revised 2017 Porsche Panamera, Stuttgart finally got it right, and the 2018 Panamera Sport Turismo variant seen here pushes that boundary into dead sexy.

If you don’t believe us, listen to our car designer extraordinaire, Robert Cumberford, “This is more like it. In one simple profile revision, from whalelike fastback four-door to tough-looking aerodynamic sport wagon, Porsche’s Panamera has been transformed from a car I wouldn’t want to be seen driving into something I actually could covet.”

The Panamera Sport Turismo will be sold as a 2018 model and hit dealerships later this year. When it comes to the U.S., it will be available with four different engines; a 330-hp turbo V-6, a 462-hp twin-turbo V-6 hybrid, a 440-hp twin turbo V-6, and a 550-hp twin-turbo V-8, all of which will be coupled to Porsche’s all-wheel-drive system.

The base model will be the standard Panamera 4 Sport Turismo, starting at $97,250 and featuring the 330-horsepower single-turbo V-6 engine. Moving up, the Panamera 4 E-Hybrid Sport Turismo comes in at $105,050 and features a 2.9-liter twin-turbocharged V-6 coupled to an electric motor that develops in total, 462 horsepower. The next rung nets the customer the Panamera 4S Sport Turismo and starts at $110,250 and features a 440 horsepower 2.9-liter twin-turbocharged V-6. Lastly is the Panamera Turbo Sport Turismo. Starting at $155,050, the car features a 550-horsepower 4.0-liter twin-turbocharged V-8.

Panamera Sport Turismo1Panamera Sport Turismo1

However, the storage space and rear jump seats are what people will notice first. Thanks to that longer roofline, the Panamera Sport Turismo now has 18.3 cubic feet of rear compartment space with the seats up. With the seats folded, that space increases to 49 cubic feet. Additionally, as mentioned above, the Panamera Sport Turismo is the first Panamera to include an optional single rear jump seat.

The tailgate itself also has a lower loading edge, coming in at only 24.7 inches.

And, just like the standard Panamera, the Panamera Sport Turismo has one of the coolest active rear-wing designs on the market, Porsche’s Active Aerodynamics (PAA). Under acceleration, the back of the roof extends and is able to angle itself in three distinct stages and generate an additional 110 lbs of downforce on the rear axle.

Up to 105 mph, the spoiler’s “guide element” stays retracted “with an angle of minus 7 degrees,” thus reducing drag and optimizing the car’s efficiency. Putting your foot into it a little more and going above 105 mph, the spoiler “moves into performance position with an angle of plus 1 degree, increasing driving stability and lateral dynamics.” Finally, when in Sport or Sport Plus modes, the spoiler automatically changes to the performance position after only 56 mph and continues working as speeds increase.

Not only does the new active spoiler help the Panamera Sport Turismo’s performance, but PAA can use the spoiler to help “minimize wind noise” when the panoramic roof is open by modulating the wing’s inclination.

The all-new 2018 Panamera Sport Turismo will make its official debut March 7 at the Geneva Motor Show.

Panamera Sport Turismo 15 Porsche Panamera 4 E Hybrid Sport Turismo 21 rear seat configuration Panamera Sport Turismo 9 2018 Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo rear three quarter 2018 Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo interior 2018 Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo front three quarter 2018 Porsche Panamera 4 E Hybrid Sport Turismo front three quarter 2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo S E Hybrid Rear Three Quarters In Motion 2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo S E Hybrid Rear Three Quarters In Motion 2 2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo S E Hybrid Interior 2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo S E Hybrid Front Three Quarters 2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo S E Hybrid Front In Motion

2018 Porsche Panamera 4 E Hybrid Sport Turismo front three quarter2018 Porsche Panamera 4 E Hybrid Sport Turismo front three quarter

The post Porsche Debuts Panamera Sport Turismo appeared first on Automobile Magazine.

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gradualepiphany
115 days ago
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Mm. Doesn't look all that different to me.
Los Angeles, California, USA
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VOLTA ELECTRIC BICYCLE

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The Volta Electric Bicycle by Pure Cycles is being dubbed as the smartest e-bike ever. Volta packs an impressive 40 mile range on a single charge, has the battery packed neatly into the frame, and a rear-mounted motor with 4 power modes, so you can get exactly as much assistance as you want. The sleek package also includes an integrated front basket, a belt drive (or 8-speed chain), integrated headlights and taillights (activate automatically in low light and when you brake), and an accompanying app that tracks your health, your trips, battery level, and comes with anti-theft GPS tracking so you?ll never lose your ride. watch the video below

Learn more from Pure Cycles, or pre-order now from Kickstarter
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gradualepiphany
115 days ago
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It is not an encouraging sign that this bike is being made by people who do not know how to properly install a Brooks saddle.
Los Angeles, California, USA
duerig
115 days ago
Can you explain this? I'm not a bike person, so I can't see what is wrong with their mounting.
gradualepiphany
115 days ago
The bike seat they've fitted in that photo is a Brooks knockoff - with that shape of saddle you sit on wide bit at the back. When installing a Brooks style saddle, you want the back section of the saddle to be flat, with the nose pointing up. If you install it the way they did (with the nose of the saddle parallel with the ground), the rider is going to be constantly sliding forwards off of he wide part of the saddle and onto the front, narrow part. This generally results in bits-between-your-legs pain as well as arm/shoulder pain because the rider has to constantly push their body backwards using their arms. It's a dead giveaway that you are looking at a bike that was set up by a hipster who never rides more than 5 miles and doesn't know what they're doing.
gradualepiphany
115 days ago
It should look like this: http://www.brooksengland.com/media/contenttype/contentmanager/cache/800x600/BreadwinnerArborLodge.jpg
gradualepiphany
115 days ago
(The much more charitable and likely explanation is that the photographer thought the bike looked stupid with the saddle pointed up and had an assistant mess it up)
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Apple CEO Tim Cook: 'You Will See Us Do More in the Pro Area'

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During a Q&A session at today's shareholder meeting held at Apple's Cupertino campus, Apple CEO Tim Cook reassured investors that Apple is still very much focused on its professional customers and has plans to "do more" in the pro area.

"You will see us do more in the pro area," Cook said. "The pro area is very important to us. The creative area is very important to us in particular."

Cook's comments were directed towards the Mac, Apple Watch, services, and iPad, but may reassure those who are worried that Apple is abandoning its desktop Mac lineup, especially the Mac Pro. The Mac Pro has not been updated since December of 2013, going more than 1,100 days without a refresh.

Other desktop Macs have also gone more than a year without an update. The iMac last saw a refresh in October of 2015, more than 500 days ago, while the Mac mini was last updated in October of 2014, over 860 days ago.

"Don't think something we've done or something that we're doing that isn't visible yet is a signal that our priorities are elsewhere," Cook also told investors.

There have been no hints that a Mac mini or Mac Pro refresh is on the horizon, but Apple is rumored to be planning to introduce new iMacs in 2017, perhaps as early as March. Future iMacs are expected to be updated with USB-C ports and AMD graphics chips.

At the meeting, Cook was also questioned about a potential convergence between the Mac and iPad lines, in the from of a touchscreen Mac. While Cook said he didn't want to comment on future product plans, he again reiterated that he sees the iPad and the Mac as two separate product lines that serve different purposes.

"Expect us to do more and more where people will view it as a laptop replacement, but not a Mac replacement - the Mac does so much more," he said. "To merge these worlds, you would lose the simplicity of one, and the power of the other."

Much of the rest of the shareholder meeting consisted of voting on several proposals and reiterating information that was previously shared during Apple's January earnings call. While no shareholder proposals passed - including those calling for increased diversity and more transparency about donations - Apple reelected its board of directors, approved board compensation, and approved Ernst and Young as the company's accounting firm.

Tag: Tim Cook

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gradualepiphany
116 days ago
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Stand by for the Apple Watch Pro.
Los Angeles, California, USA
freeAgent
116 days ago
Maybe an iPod Pro too?
dreadhead
116 days ago
More dongles.
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tingham
116 days ago
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JFC. Just ship a decent Mac pls.
Cary, NC
acdha
116 days ago
I'm curious: I'm sure support, regulatory approvals, etc. are significant but still — how many employees would they need to take something like the last iMac case and ship an update with modern parts – are we talking 5, 10, 50? $7B should pay for a few engineers…
peelman
114 days ago
soooo many places are standing by waiting on MacBook Pros and Mac Pros. This is reassuring, but only marginally. And so help me, if their answer is an "iMac Pro" i'm going to scream.

Congress May Lack Technical Expertise to Properly Investigate Russian Hacking

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Congressional intelligence committee leaders have pledged to examine Russia’s involvement in hacks against Democrats during the 2016 presidential election. As the ranking member of the Senate’s intelligence panel, Rep. Adam Schiff put it, “we want to make sure that the intelligence community got it right…We want to look at the raw intelligence, and make sure their conclusions were substantiated.”

But a detailed investigation into hacking demands technical skills that staff for the House and Senate Intelligence Committees appear to be lacking.

Research into public committee staff lists, LinkedIn, and conversations with several sources who have interacted with the committees shows a serious dearth of technical expertise among the staffers cleared to access classified materials that would be involved in the investigation. Essentially, committee staff are underwater when it comes to poking into the nitty gritty of cyber warfare — a longstanding problem made more relevant as attacks on U.S. government and politicians escalate.

Committees and their members customarily rely on staff to do the heavy lifting to prepare background research, evaluate evidence and information, and advise on policy and legal issues. Depending on the committee, staffers are typically well versed in the law, international affairs, Washington policy debates, and more. But a technical matter like the election hacks benefits from knowledge of coding, information security, and attribution.

The bulk of staff on the intelligence committees — more than two dozen on each — are lawyers, policy wonks, and budget experts.  Many staffers worked in the legislative affairs offices of other senators and members of Congress, government budget offices, the Department of Justice, the military, private law firms, defense contractors, or Washington think tanks. While they’ve served for many years in their respective areas, those areas are rarely technical.

While some programs were created in recent years to remedy the desperate need for computer scientists and hackers on the Hill—like TechCongress, a tech policy fellowship in D.C.—the intelligence committees don’t normally accept fellows or detailees due to the sensitivity of the policy issues they discuss.

“Anecdotally, of the 15,000 staff in Congress, I’m aware of six that have technology-related educational backgrounds,” Travis Moore, the founder and director of TechCongress told The Intercept in response to a question about the staffing on the intelligence committees. “This is a problem. All policy is increasingly ‘tech’ policy.”

Spokespeople for the House and Senate Intelligence Committees declined comment on the expertise of their staff. The Senate Intelligence Committee does have new leadership in Democratic Sen. Mark Warner, who made his fortune investing in the cellular telecom industry and took a prominent role in the debate over encryption technology last Congress and who may emphasize technical issues in the coming debates over Russia.

But at the end of the day, there’s not much money to throw around, and adding a technical staffer might mean replacing another qualified legal or policy expert. “Congressional budgets have been slashed 35% and even officers that would like to hire for this expertise don’t have the resources to do so,” Moore said.

What technical knowledge the committees have historically added to their staffs is typically rooted in the legal sphere or the policy space rather than in the nuts and bolts of tech.

“Evidence of hacking, computer forensics, and attribution are highly technical fields,” Steven Bellovin, a computer science researcher and professor at Columbia University with experience advising the government on technology, wrote in an email.

“If you don’t have independent experts in those fields, you cannot independently evaluate the evidence — all you can do is look at their reports and see if all of the analysts agree,” Bellovin added.

There are staffers with some tech-related experience, like Bob Minehart of the House Intelligence Committee, who spent several decades in the intelligence community, including at the NSA doing “technical” work, according to Yahoo News. But even Minehart “may not have the right background for attribution” Bellovin said. Minehart, who has served in Congress for 12 years, works on the “Technical and Tactical” Subcommittee of the House Intelligence Committee, which polices the NSA, the National Reconnaissance Office, and the National Geospatial Intelligence agency on issues including offensive and defense cyber capabilities. Then there’s Brett Freedman, a counsel to the Senate Intelligence Committee, who spent time in the NSA and worked on the President’s Review Group on Intelligence and Communication technologies to advise President Barack Obama on how to maintain intelligence collection capabilities while protecting privacy and civil liberties. While often working on cyber policy issues, Freedman’s role appears strictly legal rather than technical. Neither Minehart or Freedman responded to a request for comment.

Other staffers were intelligence analysts for the government, served on the National Security Council, worked in the Pentagon, or were in the private sector working on defense at companies like Booz Allen Hamilton or BAE Systems.

Chris Soghoian, formerly the chief technologist of the American Civil Liberties Union and now a TechCongress fellow, has worked with several Members on technical issues including Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., who serves on the Senate Intelligence Committee—but never on the Russia investigation, confirmed by Hill staffers who have worked with him. Soghoian was not available for comment.

A major part of the investigation into Russian groups’ malicious cyber activities is actually linking their habits and traits, their trail of breadcrumbs, to the DNC hack itself. It’s challenging to solve whodunits in the cyber realm, because it’s possible to hide your tracks, and you can strike from halfway across the world without warning.

It is “continuity of knowledge” of past attacks and understanding of the “style of the attack and the tools and the software used” that helps companies make confident assessments about who’s behind what, Bellovin notes.

There’s a “typical tendency of governments to appoint lawyers to senior roles in leading all their cyber efforts,” according to Tony Cole, the Chief Technical Officer of Global Government at cybersecurity firm FireEye. “The legal expertise is needed to ensure all applicable laws are followed, especially since this is a relatively gray area in the area around international law…[but] more operational cyber expertise at the most senior levels in government is needed badly,” he wrote in an email to The Intercept.

Security experts criticized the government’s rather pitiful report on the DNC hacks in December titled “Grizzly Steppe,” which listed malicious IP addresses as evidence of the attacks’ attribution to Russia—but noted that private sector reports painted a more revealing picture of the historical behavior of those groups than the report itself. Crowdstrike has been tracking purported Russian hacking groups—“Fancy Bear” and “The Dukes”—for years, since at least 2007.

“There have been personnel detailed to the committees in the past to try to provide greater technical expertise. But it’s always been woefully inadequate to the task,” Amy Zegart, the co-director of the Center for International Security and Cooperation, wrote in an email. Zegart penned a 2011 essay for the Hoover Institution titled “The Roots of Weak Congressional Intelligence Oversight” discussing the need for detailed knowledge and experience in the intelligence community to properly patrol its conduct.

Zegart helped launch a boot camp for congressional staffers to beef up on cyber issues at Stanford University in 2014, which they’ll be hosting again this summer— a program with a long waitlist. But it’s not been sufficient, yet. “The fundamental challenge is you can’t oversee something effectively if you don’t understand it,” she concluded.

The post Congress May Lack Technical Expertise to Properly Investigate Russian Hacking appeared first on The Intercept.

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gradualepiphany
116 days ago
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Congress lacks the technical expertise to save files anywhere other than the desktop.
Los Angeles, California, USA
freeAgent
116 days ago
One thing I've noticed about The Intercept is that they can take even fairly obvious and straightforward news such as this and turn it into a full-length article.
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Forgive my haterade clicktivism, but we don’t need these new words

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New coinages that reflect the latest wave of online political activism form a significant section of more than 300 new definitions in the database, which is a sister work to the Oxford English Dictionary.

Additions including “clicktivism” (a pejorative word for armchair activists on social media), “haterade” (excessive negativity, criticism, or resentment), “otherize” (view or treat – a person or group of people – as intrinsically different from and alien to oneself) and “herd mentality” (the tendency for people’s behaviour or beliefs to conform to those of the group to which they belong) all emerged during the 2016 battle for the White House, said head of content development Angus Stevenson.

Who exactly is the gatekeeper?:

“Craptacular” (remarkably poor and disappointing), “bronde” (hair dyed both blond and brunette) and “fitspiration” (a person or thing that serves as motivation for someone to sustain or improve health and fitness) all made the cut.

Here is the Guardian story by Danuta Kean.

The post Forgive my haterade clicktivism, but we don’t need these new words appeared first on Marginal REVOLUTION.

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gradualepiphany
117 days ago
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Uh. Haterade was in full use when I was a teenager in NC in the 90s.
Los Angeles, California, USA
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fxer
115 days ago
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Herd mentality is new? That can't be right, lemmings
Bend, Oregon
IainBertram
115 days ago
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The oxford dictionary records all words in usage in published written English. There is no gate keeper.
superiphi
115 days ago
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it's not about "do we need" - if these are finding significant use, they will be recorded
Idle, Bradford, United Kingdom
duerig
117 days ago
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Nobody is the gatekeeper. Welcome to the English language.

Honestly, it is probably for the best that we don't have a government institute defining our language like the french. I think that would be a yuuuge problem...
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